University of Southern California


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Kristina Lerman
 
 
       
  Social Media Analysis  
  The biggest story of the last few years has been the phenomenal growth of social media, and the technological, social and political transformations that accompanied it. Social media sparked an information revolution by putting knowledge production and communication tools in the hands of the masses. Today on sites such as Twitter, Flickr, and YouTube, large numbers of users publish rich content, annotate it with descriptive metadata, and engage in discussions and collaborations with others. Social media promises to transform how we create and use knowledge, respond to disasters, monitor environment, manage resources, and interact with the world and one another. Social media offers new research opportunities and challenges. Our group is studying dynamics of information spread along social ties, how limited attention constrains an individual's ability to interact with others online, dynamics of visibility and how it can be manipulated to promote or suppress messages, and the role of content in the dynamics of information spread and evolution of networks.  
       
  Our methods will allow us to understand the collective effects of network structure, social interactions, and psychological constraints (e.g., limited attention), on dynamics of information spread, and will lead to more effective tools to leverage community's knowledge to address a number of problems, including identifying important trends, assessing information quality, and separating true information from rumors.  
       

       
  Papers  
       
  Hodas, N. and K. Lerman, 2012. How Visibility and Divided Attention Constrain Social Contagion, in review.
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  K. Lerman, Suradej Intagorn, Jeon-Hyung Kang, Rumi Ghosh, 2012. Using Proximity to Predict Activity in Social Networks, in review.
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  Hogg, T. and K. Lerman, 2012. Social Dynamics of Digg, EPJ Data Scienced.
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  K. Lerman and Hogg, T., 2010. Using a Model of Social Dynamics to Predict Popularity of News, Proc. of World Wide Web Conference, Raleigh, NC.
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  Project Staff  
       
  Kristina Lerman, USC
Tad Hogg, Institute for Molecular Manufacturing
Nathan Hodas, USC
Jeon-Hyung Kang, USC
Suradej Intagorn, USC