Jose-Luis Ambite

Researches novel approaches to information integration to discover new insights in biomedical and genetic data.

ISI News

ISI Postdoctoral Scholar Chosen for Prestigious Program

Yonatan Bisk, a postdoctoral scholar and research associate in ISI's intelligent systems division, has been named to a novel program being offered by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

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ISI Researchers Recognized for Reproducibility

A 2013 journal paper co-authored by Information Sciences Institute Director of Knowledge Technologies Yolanda Gil and postdoctoral student Daniel Garijo is among a handful of articles chosen to represent the best of open-access publishing.

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John Heidemann and Student Win Best Paper

ISI research professor John Heidemann, together with post-doctoral scholar Ricardo de Oliveria Schmidt and masters student Jan Harm Kuipers, both at the University of Twente (Netherlands), were awarded Best Paper at the 2017 Passive and Active Measurements (PAM) conference in late March.

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Feature Story

What's Going On: Of Bots and Human Behavior

April 18, 2017

Emilio Ferrara's research on social bots was compelling even before the current Congressional investigations into likely Russian hacks surrounding the 2016 US presidential election.

More than 100 media outlets, including The New York Times, CBS News, The Wall Street Journal and UK's Daily Mail, have covered Ferrara's work in the past month. And in a March, 2017 Senate intelligence hearing into cybersecurity vulnerabilities, experts flagged the steep rise in social media bots. Ferrara initially had reported those suspicious activities, in the journal First Monday, one day before last year's election.

Bots are scripts that impersonate real people while operating automatically, often with a specific agenda - in this case, tearing down or building up Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump or their respective political platforms. According to Ferrara, bots are now so pervasive that they may distort public opinion far more than is commonly believed, and reflect planted, predetermined sentiments toward their targets.

Where Twitter estimated in 2015 that five percent of its accounts were bots, Ferrara concluded that 10 percent is a conservative estimate - and 15 percent is more realistic. What's more, he found that bots, which operate around the clock, generate a far larger percentage of Twitter activity than their human counterparts. People also turn out to be mediocre at distinguishing human- and bot-generated tweets.

In March, Ferrara gave ISIers a deeper look into the methodology and analytics behind his team's results. "Bots and Human Behavior in Techno- social Systems" was the latest in ISI's "What's Going On" series, which expands researchers' knowledge of work taking place Institute-wide. The lively talk was attended by about 30 colleagues in ISI's Marina del Rey, California and Arlington, Virginia locales.Read More

ISI Annual Report

View the 2016 ISI Annual Report.

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Robotic Labs and Science as a Service

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Feature Story

What's Going On: Of Bots and Human Behavior

April 18, 2017

Emilio Ferrara's research on social bots was compelling even before the current Congressional investigations into likely Russian hacks surrounding the 2016 US presidential election.

More than 100 media outlets, including The New York Times, CBS News, The Wall Street Journal and UK's Daily Mail, have covered Ferrara's work in the past month. And in a March, 2017 Senate intelligence hearing into cybersecurity vulnerabilities, experts flagged the steep rise in social media bots. Ferrara initially had reported those suspicious activities, in the journal First Monday, one day before last year's election.

Bots are scripts that impersonate real people while operating automatically, often with a specific agenda - in this case, tearing down or building up Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump or their respective political platforms. According to Ferrara, bots are now so pervasive that they may distort public opinion far more than is commonly believed, and reflect planted, predetermined sentiments toward their targets.

Where Twitter estimated in 2015 that five percent of its accounts were bots, Ferrara concluded that 10 percent is a conservative estimate - and 15 percent is more realistic. What's more, he found that bots, which operate around the clock, generate a far larger percentage of Twitter activity than their human counterparts. People also turn out to be mediocre at distinguishing human- and bot-generated tweets.

In March, Ferrara gave ISIers a deeper look into the methodology and analytics behind his team's results. "Bots and Human Behavior in Techno- social Systems" was the latest in ISI's "What's Going On" series, which expands researchers' knowledge of work taking place Institute-wide. The lively talk was attended by about 30 colleagues in ISI's Marina del Rey, California and Arlington, Virginia locales.Read More