John Damoulakis

Directs advanced electronics and researches deeply scaled systems, including computing and communications payloads, microelectronics and reconfigurable electronics for space applications.

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ISI News

Prem Natarajan Named Inaugural Keston Executive Director

Visionary and inspiring gift to the USC Information Sciences Institute (ISI)

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NPR: Machines, Lost In Translation - The Dream Of Universal Understanding

NPR quoted Kevin Knight about efforts by computer scientists to develop universal translators.

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MIT Technology Review: Best of 2015 - The Social-Network Illusion That Tricks Your Mind

MIT Technology Review featured research by Kristina Lerman and colleagues on how social networks can create the illusion that something is common when it's actually rare within a network.

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Feature Story

ISI'S Terry Benzel and DETER Project Featured By NSF

December 21, 2015

On December 16, the National Science Foundation's website and social media feeds prominently featured a major cybersecurity study and recommendations co-led by ISI's Terry Benzel and colleagues at SRI International.

Called Cybersecurity Experimentation of the Future (CEF), the NSF-sponsored effort involved 150 researchers from 75 organizations. Benzel leads the DETER Project, a prominent, multi-institutional research and testbed initiative serving cybersecurity experts worldwide. The CEF's primary takeaway: The research community needs to develop a "science of cybersecurity experimentation" around methods, approaches and techniques that support rigorous, reproducible studies. As in any other form of science, the ability to test, reuse and build on previous research - including peer review and repeatability - is crucial. The report concludes that scientific method, common standards and ways to work across differing disciplines and domains are far more important than which hardware, software or networking capabilities researchers choose to deploy. Recommendations include making cybersecurity experimental environments work together in a plug-and-play fashion, and making infrastructure more intuitive so experts can spend time doing critical science, not laboring to use its tools. As the NSF article makes clear, amplifying scientific investigation is essential to counter the asymmetry between attackers...Read More

Meet Our Researchers

Events

Unless otherwise noted, seminars are open to the public.

Feb 09Reza Rawassizadeh, Research Scientist - UC RiversideSpecial Seminar

Learning Human Behavioral Dynamics through Mobile and Wearable Data

11:00am - 12:00pm PST
Feb 12Artemy KolchinskyAI Seminar

Multi-scale integration and modularity in complex dynamical systems

11:00am - 12:00pm PST
Feb 12Thang LuongNL Seminar

Recent Advances in Neural Machine Translation

3:00pm - 4:00pm PST
See More Events »

Feature Story

ISI'S Terry Benzel and DETER Project Featured By NSF

December 21, 2015

On December 16, the National Science Foundation's website and social media feeds prominently featured a major cybersecurity study and recommendations co-led by ISI's Terry Benzel and colleagues at SRI International.

Called Cybersecurity Experimentation of the Future (CEF), the NSF-sponsored effort involved 150 researchers from 75 organizations. Benzel leads the DETER Project, a prominent, multi-institutional research and testbed initiative serving cybersecurity experts worldwide. The CEF's primary takeaway: The research community needs to develop a "science of cybersecurity experimentation" around methods, approaches and techniques that support rigorous, reproducible studies. As in any other form of science, the ability to test, reuse and build on previous research - including peer review and repeatability - is crucial. The report concludes that scientific method, common standards and ways to work across differing disciplines and domains are far more important than which hardware, software or networking capabilities researchers choose to deploy. Recommendations include making cybersecurity experimental environments work together in a plug-and-play fashion, and making infrastructure more intuitive so experts can spend time doing critical science, not laboring to use its tools. As the NSF article makes clear, amplifying scientific investigation is essential to counter the asymmetry between attackers...Read More