Jerry R. Hobbs

Explores computational linguistics, ontology, discourse analysis and other areas to improve computers’ ability to derive meaning from human language.

ISI News

Root Matters: ISI Greatly Enhances Internet Root Server

The USC Information Sciences Institute launched a second physical site of the Internet root server it manages on May 2, greatly boosting the service's ability to fulfill an unusual, dual mandate.

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ISI Postdoctoral Scholar Chosen for Prestigious Program

Yonatan Bisk, a postdoctoral scholar and research associate in ISI's intelligent systems division, has been named to a novel program being offered by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

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ISI Researchers Recognized for Reproducibility

A 2013 journal paper co-authored by Information Sciences Institute Director of Knowledge Technologies Yolanda Gil and postdoctoral student Daniel Garijo is among a handful of articles chosen to represent the best of open-access publishing.

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Feature Story

Root Matters: ISI Greatly Enhances Internet Root Server

June 28, 2017

Pedro Szekely understands dark matter in an all-too-human, not cosmological, universe. Beginning in 2015, his work with Craig Knoblock on sophisticated, cloud-based analytics has generated substantial media attention for its ability to expose human trafficking hidden deeply online. The system essentially uses open-source software to transform hard-to-search data into concrete law enforcement leads.

Szekely recently gave a seminar describing how cloud-based Domain-Specific Insight Graphs (DIGs) plumb the dark and open web. That vast counterpart to the conventional, surface web is a favorite destination for human traffickers, gun runners and other illegal operatives. Part of ISI's continuing "What's Going On" series that deepens researchers' knowledge of work being conducted Institute-wide, the talk was attended by about 30 ISIers in Marina del Rey, California and Arlington, Virginia.

Szekely began with the mandate issued by his DARPA project manager: Search millions of web pages, all in different formats, for names, phone numbers and any other relevant information of specific people who had little other identifying information. The task is part of Memex, a DARPA browser created to help law enforcement uncover patterns and relationship in previously unsearchable criminal data. His project manager, says Szekely, "poses these crazy challenges and people actually figure out how to do something useful."Read More

ISI Annual Report

View the 2016 ISI Annual Report.

Events

Unless otherwise noted, seminars are open to the public.

Jun 29Valentino CrespiAI Seminar

Quantitative Methods to Learn, Detect, and Track Processes

11:00am - 12:00pm PDT
Jul 07Professor James Gleeson, University of LimerickAI Seminar

Branching process models for information transmission and centrality

11:00am - 12:00pm PDT
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Feature Story

Root Matters: ISI Greatly Enhances Internet Root Server

June 28, 2017

Pedro Szekely understands dark matter in an all-too-human, not cosmological, universe. Beginning in 2015, his work with Craig Knoblock on sophisticated, cloud-based analytics has generated substantial media attention for its ability to expose human trafficking hidden deeply online. The system essentially uses open-source software to transform hard-to-search data into concrete law enforcement leads.

Szekely recently gave a seminar describing how cloud-based Domain-Specific Insight Graphs (DIGs) plumb the dark and open web. That vast counterpart to the conventional, surface web is a favorite destination for human traffickers, gun runners and other illegal operatives. Part of ISI's continuing "What's Going On" series that deepens researchers' knowledge of work being conducted Institute-wide, the talk was attended by about 30 ISIers in Marina del Rey, California and Arlington, Virginia.

Szekely began with the mandate issued by his DARPA project manager: Search millions of web pages, all in different formats, for names, phone numbers and any other relevant information of specific people who had little other identifying information. The task is part of Memex, a DARPA browser created to help law enforcement uncover patterns and relationship in previously unsearchable criminal data. His project manager, says Szekely, "poses these crazy challenges and people actually figure out how to do something useful."Read More