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Computer Science Students Unleash Power of Social Web Data

More than 100 students presented their final project posters as part of a new data science course taught by ISI’s Emilio Ferrara and Fred Morstatter.Read More

ISI News

ISI Spotlight: Nazgol Tavabi, Ph.D. Student and ISI Graduate Research Assistant

Nazgol Tavabi, a Ph.D. student at ISI, has participated in award-winning large-scale projects with her advisor Kristina Lerman, a research assistant professor in computer science and ISI principle scientist. Originally from Iran, at ISI, Tavabi is part of the Machine Intelligence and Data Science research group, developing machine learning algorithms to analyze data for a variety of applications, from social science to biomedicine and cybersecurity. Tavabi sat down with us to share her experiences.

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FastCompany: USC ISI Scientists are Fighting Back Against Deepfakes

Researchers at the USC Information Sciences Institute (USC ISI) have just announced the creation of new software that uses artificial intelligence to quickly detect deepfake video with 96% accuracy.

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Deepfakes: ISI Researchers Develop Forensic Techniques to Identify Tampered Videos

Computer scientists from the USC Information Sciences Institute (USC ISI), including Ekraam Sabir, Jiaxin Cheng, Ayush Jaiswal, Wael Abd-Almageed, Iacopo Masi, and Prem Natarajan, have developed a method that performs with 96 percent accuracy in identifying deepfakes when evaluated on large scale deepfake dataset.

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Feature Story

ISI Researcher's Machine Learning Method Unearths Early Signs of Alzheimer’s

January 28, 2019

Nearly 50 million people worldwide have Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. While age is the greatest risk factor for developing the disease, researchers believe most Alzheimer’s cases occur as a result of complex interactions among genes and other factors. But those factors and the role they play are not known—yet.

In a new study, USC researchers used machine learning to identify potential blood-based markers of Alzheimer’s disease that could help with earlier diagnosis and lead to non-invasive ways of tracking the progress of the disease in patients.

The method was developed by USC computer science research assistant professor Greg Ver Steeg, a senior research lead at the USC Information Sciences Institute (ISI). Machine learning is a subset of artificial intelligence (AI) that gives computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed.

“This type of analysis is a novel way of discovering patterns of data to identify key diagnostic markers of disease,” said team member Paul Thompson, the associate director of the USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute and professor in the Keck School of Medicine at USC. “In a very large database of health measures, it helped us discover predictive features of Alzheimer’s disease that nobody suspected were there.”

The study, “Uncovering Biologically Coherent Peripheral Signatures of Health and Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease in the Aging Brain,” appeared in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, Nov. 28. The study authors are from the USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute and the USC Information Sciences Institute.  

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Feature Story

ISI Researcher's Machine Learning Method Unearths Early Signs of Alzheimer’s

January 28, 2019

Nearly 50 million people worldwide have Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. While age is the greatest risk factor for developing the disease, researchers believe most Alzheimer’s cases occur as a result of complex interactions among genes and other factors. But those factors and the role they play are not known—yet.

In a new study, USC researchers used machine learning to identify potential blood-based markers of Alzheimer’s disease that could help with earlier diagnosis and lead to non-invasive ways of tracking the progress of the disease in patients.

The method was developed by USC computer science research assistant professor Greg Ver Steeg, a senior research lead at the USC Information Sciences Institute (ISI). Machine learning is a subset of artificial intelligence (AI) that gives computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed.

“This type of analysis is a novel way of discovering patterns of data to identify key diagnostic markers of disease,” said team member Paul Thompson, the associate director of the USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute and professor in the Keck School of Medicine at USC. “In a very large database of health measures, it helped us discover predictive features of Alzheimer’s disease that nobody suspected were there.”

The study, “Uncovering Biologically Coherent Peripheral Signatures of Health and Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease in the Aging Brain,” appeared in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, Nov. 28. The study authors are from the USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute and the USC Information Sciences Institute.  

Read More