Exit Full Site
Kristina Lerman

Deciphers structure and dynamics of social media to organize knowledge, understand user groups and predict emerging trends and behavior.

More »

ISI News

ISI Postdoctoral Scholar Chosen for Prestigious Program

Yonatan Bisk, a postdoctoral scholar and research associate in ISI's intelligent systems division, has been named to a novel program being offered by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

Read More

ISI Researchers Recognized for Reproducibility

A 2013 journal paper co-authored by Information Sciences Institute Director of Knowledge Technologies Yolanda Gil and postdoctoral student Daniel Garijo is among a handful of articles chosen to represent the best of open-access publishing.

Read More

John Heidemann and Student Win Best Paper

ISI research professor John Heidemann, together with post-doctoral scholar Ricardo de Oliveria Schmidt and masters student Jan Harm Kuipers, both at the University of Twente (Netherlands), were awarded Best Paper at the 2017 Passive and Active Measurements (PAM) conference in late March.

Read More
See More Stories »

Feature Story

Root Matters: ISI Greatly Enhances Internet Root Server

June 12, 2017

The USC Information Sciences Institute launched a second physical site of the Internet root server it manages on May 2, greatly boosting the service's ability to fulfill an unusual, dual mandate. Root servers are pivotal to Net operations, and the USC ISI service performs operational heavy lifting while supporting groundbreaking Net research. "We serve a different need" than most other root service operators, says Terry Benzel, ISI deputy director for its computer networks division. "We'll be able to delve deeper into new technologies at the same time that we carry our weight in name resolution."

The new Miami location caps a five-year effort to re-architect and upgrade the original Los Angeles site. Called B-Root, the USC ISI-managed service is one of the original, authoritative root servers worldwide - and the only one managed directly by researchers.

Despite their underground connotations, root servers form the uppermost layer in an inverse Net operations pyramid. As message points-of-entry, they answer other servers' requests for contact IP addresses about global domains such as .com and .org, and for country codes such as .ca, .jp and .in. Root servers solely return information about these highest-level names, never transmitting individual messages such as email and web traffic.Read More

ISI Annual Report

View the 2016 ISI Annual Report.

Events

Unless otherwise noted, seminars are open to the public.

Jun 29Valentino CrespiAI Seminar

Quantitative Methods to Learn, Detect, and Track Processes

11:00am - 12:00pm PDT
See More Events »

ISI Seminar Series

Keep up-to-date with the ISI seminars by subscribing below. You will have the option of subscribing to individual seminar topics.

Subscribe to seminar notifications

Feature Story

Root Matters: ISI Greatly Enhances Internet Root Server

June 12, 2017

The USC Information Sciences Institute launched a second physical site of the Internet root server it manages on May 2, greatly boosting the service's ability to fulfill an unusual, dual mandate. Root servers are pivotal to Net operations, and the USC ISI service performs operational heavy lifting while supporting groundbreaking Net research. "We serve a different need" than most other root service operators, says Terry Benzel, ISI deputy director for its computer networks division. "We'll be able to delve deeper into new technologies at the same time that we carry our weight in name resolution."

The new Miami location caps a five-year effort to re-architect and upgrade the original Los Angeles site. Called B-Root, the USC ISI-managed service is one of the original, authoritative root servers worldwide - and the only one managed directly by researchers.

Despite their underground connotations, root servers form the uppermost layer in an inverse Net operations pyramid. As message points-of-entry, they answer other servers' requests for contact IP addresses about global domains such as .com and .org, and for country codes such as .ca, .jp and .in. Root servers solely return information about these highest-level names, never transmitting individual messages such as email and web traffic.Read More